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View Full Version : Buying SSD and moving HDD to Optical bay need advise



amnesia
30th April 2013, 06:55 AM
I know who to remove and replace the drives and I now have downloaded Mountain Lion onto a thumb drive.

What I want to know is now I have MLion on the main SSD and its also on the HDD ( where all my emails . word docx's are etc) When I start up as normal I assume that my Post Office email program will not show up on the task bar or any of my programs?

How can I get them on the taskbar to access as before without having to move files about?

Lastly this new SSR is only 240 gig where my HDD in the optical drive is 750gig so I cant just clone one drive to another.

Needs some great advise please :-)

mmulhern
30th April 2013, 07:52 AM
On my old PowerMac QS2002, I've got a 60GB SSD Boot Drive and I use symlinks to "point" the OS to the folders on the (previous boot) 500GB HDD.

I'm told that you could use the Advanced Options in the Accounts pane of System Preferences to set the new location of your old drive, but I haven't tried this on any of my newer machines.

JimWOz
30th April 2013, 09:43 AM
Assuming you have a big home directory, then copy it to another external drive. Erase you HDD. Copy your Home directory back onto the clean HDD.
Then as per MM's advice hook up to this directory as your user home directory location using the advanced option in Users & Groups (I'm on 10.7). Access this by unlocking and right click on your user icon. Change the path to your home directory.

amnesia
30th April 2013, 09:53 AM
Assuming you have a big home directory, then copy it to another external drive. Erase you HDD. Copy your Home directory back onto the clean HDD.
Then as per MM's advice hook up to this directory as your user home directory location using the advanced option in Users & Groups (I'm on 10.7). Access this by unlocking and right click on your user icon. Change the path to your home directory.


This sounds more scary than I thought. I prefer not to delete my 750gig HDD as it has photos, music all my fav programs etc on it. I do a weekly Time Machine back up if that helps? I dont really want to have to reinstall all my programs Ableton Live 9 with 700 plugins etc

Not being rude but what advantage is copying the home folder from my 750gB HDD to an external drive and then deleting that drive to only put the Home folder back on it?

mmulhern
30th April 2013, 11:00 AM
That way you'd only have your home directory contents, none of the OS, or other files. You can still just use the advanced option in Users&Groups to point to OLD_HDD/Users/ShortUserName

Checking what I did on my PowerMac, I did just simply change the location of my home directory for my "new" account when I added the SSD as a boot drive.

I'd still be using the Migration Assistant to "import" the applications (Only) from the OLD_HDD to the new SSD. When you change the location of the user folder for the new install, all your user settings will be available.

The way I'd do it, is when you install the new OSX on the SSD, do it as a new user (I did it as a user called MacAdmin). As this new user, run the migration assistant to import the application, then go to Users in Settings and create a new account with the same name and password as your old account, and use the advanced option to point that account to OLD_HDD/Users/ShortUserName

Log off from the "MacAdmin" account, and log in as you would, and you should now be using your old settings and data, but booted off that nice new and speedy SSD.

JimWOz
30th April 2013, 12:52 PM
..Not being rude but what advantage is copying the home folder from my 750gB HDD to an external drive and then deleting that drive to only put the Home folder back on it?

You end up with the OS on the SSD and your files on the HD, without a spare OS on it. - ie more headroom for files.
Another option is to leave the HD as it is, and hook up the home directory as above. However, you'll still have the problem with your apps if they are in /Applications on your HD, and All the licence files will be squirrelled away in the old OS file directory, not the new OS on the SSD.

To avoid application re install if it's that big an issue, copy your home directory off to a third disk. Make a new admin user, then delete your user from the HD, deleting all the files you just copied off to safety, and hopefully what's left will fit on the SSD. So, you can clone the HD to the SSD and all the apps should be happy. (apart from any that you installed just for your user name, which are in the copy. - You'll need to revalidate these licences). Then you can either erase the HD, for more headroom as above, or just copy back the user folder and hook up to it from the SSD as noted above, leaving the old OS as a backup.

amnesia
30th April 2013, 01:21 PM
My home folder appears to be 544 GB and the new SSD is 240GB :-(

The_Hawk
30th April 2013, 03:37 PM
If you are really worried about the contents of your "old" 750GB drive, why not grab a new one to put into your laptop. A new HDD isn't a lot of $$ and can give you the piece of mind of not touching having to delete anything. Also when you're done you can re-purpose the old drive as a backup.

(I'm assuming your concern is because you currently have no backup...)

amnesia
30th April 2013, 04:33 PM
If you are really worried about the contents of your "old" 750GB drive, why not grab a new one to put into your laptop. A new HDD isn't a lot of $$ and can give you the piece of mind of not touching having to delete anything. Also when you're done you can re-purpose the old drive as a backup.

(I'm assuming your concern is because you currently have no backup...)

I do have back up via Time Machine. I do a back up every Friday. I just want to make sure my laptop has all my stuff ready to use on the as before with just a faster start up and functionality.

I am still really confused about this and wonder if there is a Your Tube instructional vid but am not sure what I should be typing into the search engine.

ANy ideas?

Thanks everyone so far!

amnesia
30th April 2013, 11:07 PM
Ok I have just bought the 480 GB version OWC Mercury Extreme. I have looked at my home folder which is 5,09.2GB.

I see 230gig is itunes so I will keep that on my HHD. I should then be able to fit my Home drive on the SSD.

So I will just copy my home folder onto the SSD home folder minus the Itunes? Is that correct?

mmulhern
1st May 2013, 08:04 AM
Better to use the migration assistant when setting up the new OSX on the SSD. Just don't select iTunes.

Have a look at How to use Migration Assistant to transfer files from another Mac (http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4889) in the "Time Machine or other disk migration" section.

amnesia
1st May 2013, 08:42 AM
Better to use the migration assistant when setting up the new OSX on the SSD. Just don't select iTunes.

Have a look at How to use Migration Assistant to transfer files from another Mac (http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4889) in the "Time Machine or other disk migration" section.

Brilliant! Thanks

rpjallan
1st May 2013, 06:51 PM
Have you thought about setting up a Fusion drive?

amnesia
1st May 2013, 09:25 PM
Have you thought about setting up a Fusion drive?

Fusion drive?

rpjallan
1st May 2013, 10:25 PM
OS X 10.8.3 Now Offers Fusion Drive Possibilities For Non-Fusion Drive Equipped Macs | Other World Computing Blog (http://blog.macsales.com/17624-os-x-10-8-3-provides-fusion-drive-setup-option-for-non-fusion-drive-equipped-macs#more-17624)

mmulhern
2nd May 2013, 08:03 AM
I agree, pairing the new SSD and your "old" HDD as a Fusion drive would be a good idea. You'd get most of the benifits of using an SSD, with the cheap mass storage of the HDD. Provided you've got a TimeMachine Backup, do one last backup, as creating the Fusion drive will erase both drives in the process, then "simply" restore your backup to the new configuration. OSX will sort out what needs to be on the SSD, and what can be moved to, or left on the HDD, all without mucking around with symlinks, and account preferences, nor deciding which drive to put things on - you'll leave that to the computer, which after all, it's job supposed to make your life easier.

amnesia
2nd May 2013, 11:17 AM
I agree, pairing the new SSD and your "old" HDD as a Fusion drive would be a good idea. You'd get most of the benifits of using an SSD, with the cheap mass storage of the HDD. Provided you've got a TimeMachine Backup, do one last backup, as creating the Fusion drive will erase both drives in the process, then "simply" restore your backup to the new configuration. OSX will sort out what needs to be on the SSD, and what can be moved to, or left on the HDD, all without mucking around with symlinks, and account preferences, nor deciding which drive to put things on - you'll leave that to the computer, which after all, it's job supposed to make your life easier.

Yeah I am starting to think the Fusion Drive is the best option.

As I back up every week with Time Machine that will have my complete HD on it so I wont loose anything? That has been a worry but I am sure TMachine only backs up the changes from the previous back up.

amnesia
2nd May 2013, 11:27 AM
I hope this is the last questions. :-)

When making the Fusion drive I have SSD 480Gb main drive and 750Gb HDD optical drive. Looking at the you tube vids, when you get to Terminal CoreStorage and have to say what size you want the fusion to be so I say 1,230 but how do I type it in correctly?

i will also have 16gig 8 + 8 and the fusion drive all going into my early 2011 MacBook Pro. I wont be overheating it or damaging it in any way?

OldSapper
2nd May 2013, 11:47 AM
Hi Amnesia,

I recently built a Fusion Drive into an Early 2008, 2.5Gh Intel Core Two Duo, 17"MacBook Pro. A little daunting but not impossible. I took my time and watched the tutorial videos many time over to make sure I felt capable and wouldn't get stuck half way through.

It was originally equipped, from the factory, with 4Gb of RAM and a 250Gb Toshiba HDD, however after the warranty ran out I replaced the Drive with a new Western Digital (WD) 750Gb 7,200rpm Scorpio Black drive. This configuration had been in the MBP for a least a year.

After Apple released the new iMac's, some of which can be configured with FUSION DRIVES, I started reading online articles on how to make your own. There were also a few video tutorials i found on YouTube showing how to set it up using TERMINAL.

I then decided to look into doing in on my Old MBP. According to a few Geeks online it could, but only with MOUNTAIN LION 10.8.2. No Probs.

There were a few things that needed to happen before I started. The Parts;

1. OWC 240Gb Mercury Electra 3G SATA 2.5" SSD

2. MCE OptiBay 17" bundle, including an Optical Drive enclosure.

3. OWC 6Gb RAM. 1x2Gb and 1x4Gb module. I decided to upgrade the RAM with new cards. $154.90

4. A thumb drive with a RECOVERY DISK partition for me boot up from to use TERMINAL, and for installation of a new copy of OSX MOUNTAIN LION, plus MIGRATION ASSISTANT to bring all my old shite across to the new drive. Nil cost involved as I did the Recovery Disk myself after downloading the RECOVERY DISK ASSISTANT from the APPLE web site.

First I ran ONYX on the existing HD to get rid of any drive errors and do any repairs and then cloned it to an external 500Gb HDD using CARBON COPY CLONER. Time machine is good as well. This copy of my OS was used later in the process with MIGRATION ASSISTANT to migrate all my Apps, settings, Music and Photos onto the New FusionDrive. As mmulhand

Then I opened up the computer using an online tutorial from the OWC Web site as my guide and installed the new RAM modules, then removed the existing 750Gb drive and replaced it with the OWC Solid State Drive. Folk who had done this before said it is better to place the SSD in this location and not into the CD/DVD Opti-drive position.

I then removed the CD/DVD Opti-drive and assembled the MCE OptiBay caddy and placed the 750Gb drive into it and secured it firmly in place. I followed another online tutorial plus the paperwork that came with the enclosure to ensure I had done it correctly. Actually the enclosure was not the one shown in the paperwork and I had to read between the lines and work it out myself.

Next was the tricky part, using TERMINAL.

I restarted the computer and held down the OPTION BUTTON, which gives a selection of bootable drives available, in this case I selected RECOVERY DISK which I had placed in a USB slot before restarting. NOTE: Keep this Recovery Disk for future use, because unfortunately when you create the Fusion Drive the Hard Drive Recovery Disk is no longer there. I don't know why, but it is a bit annoying.

After booting I selected and opened TERMINAL, which is available under the UTILITIES menu and closely followed the scripting prompts on the YOUTUBE VIDEO letter for letter. Create Your Own Apple Fusion Drive - How To - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4NqbGEJpN4) (Obviously I used another computer for this) Watch it few times to get a feel for what is happening and whether you can do it.

This process took me about 15 minutes, but for someone with a bit more knowledge of Terminal, maybe 5 minutes. The only thing I stuffed up was the name of the drive. I inadvertently called it FUSIONN DRIVE. No problems there and I changed it after I had finished by simply clicking once on the desktop icon to select it, press the return key and type in the correct name.

Now that I had created the FusionDrive I needed to install the Operating System, because creating the drive erases all data. I now had a FUSION DRIVE OF 985GB.

I closed TERMINAL and opened REINSTALL Mac OS X. Reinstall Mac OS X is the icon second down in the window above. This took about 1.5hrs. An Internet connection is required during this process as it downloads the latest version of Mountain Lion from the Apple web site via your Apple/iTunes/App Store ID.

The system automatically restarts after the OS is installed and asks a few questions about Apple ID and some settings etc exactly the same way it does when you turn on a New Mac for the first time. It then gives you the option of migrating your folders, data and setting to the new Drive.

I connected the HDD with the cloned copy of my original HDD (or a Time Machine Copy) and this process took around 6 hours for approximately 350Gb of data. It took so long because unfortunately it copied multiple backup copies of the OS I had cloned, and placed them in an archive folder. I found them and deleted them after noticing that most of my new drive space was used up. If it had copied a single OS as expected the time would have been around 2 hours instead of six.

I now have a Mac that is sooooo much faster, boots up faster, opens Applications in a flash and feels great to use. Fully booted in 28 secs. It used to take 2.5 minutes.

The tutorial I mention in this post tells you how to write the size in correctly.

rpjallan
2nd May 2013, 12:52 PM
Be very careful which tutorial you follow. The OWC one I linked to explains that if you don't do this correctly you will just end up with a Core Storage volume rather than a proper Fusion Drive.

I am hoping to do this soon myself.

amnesia
2nd May 2013, 12:54 PM
Thanks Oldsapper!

I have tightened this up for myself so its easier to follow on the day. Only thing I am not sure about is I already have MLion on a thumb drive so not sure if this section is relevant to me

Restart and hold down the OPTION BUTTON,
Choose RECOVERY . I assume I have already done this. Does this mean create a thumb drive?
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FUSION SET UP

Run ONYX
get rid of any drive errors and do any repairs

Time machine back up

Install 2x 8gig

Removed the existing 750Gb drive and replaced it with the OWC Solid State Drive.

remove the CD/DVD Opti-drive and assembled the MCE OptiBay caddy and placed the 750Gb

This is the section I am not sure I need.
Restart and hold down the OPTION BUTTON,
Choose RECOVERY .
NOTE: Keep this Recovery Disk for future use, because unfortunately when you create the Fusion Drive the Hard Drive Recovery Disk is no longer there. I don't know why, but it is a bit annoying.



After booting selected TERMINAL, which is available under the UTILITIES menu and closely followed the scripting prompts on the YOUTUBE VIDEO letter for letter. Create Your Own Apple Fusion Drive - How To - YouTube

This process took me about 15 minutes

Now that I had created the FusionDrive
install the Operating System, creating the drive erases all data.

You should now have a FUSION DRIVE OF 1250GB.

Close TERMINAL
open REINSTALL Mac OS X. Reinstall Mac OS X is the icon second down in the window above. This took about 1.5hrs. An Internet connection is required during this process as it downloads the latest version of Mountain Lion from the Apple web site via your Apple/iTunes/App Store ID.

The system automatically restarts after the OS is installed and asks a few questions about Apple ID and some settings etc exactly the same way it does when you turn on a New Mac for the first time. It then gives you the option of migrating your folders, data and setting to the new Drive.

Connect the HDD with Time Machine Copy and this process took around 4 hours

OldSapper
2nd May 2013, 01:11 PM
I used a thumb drive with a copy of the RECOVERY DISK on it because all the necessary steps to boot, then format the FusionDrive, reinstall the OS and migrate your old drive info from a Timemachine backup can all be controlled and done from the one location.