Welcome to MacTalk Australia

the largest Australian community for Apple discussions and topics

Join the discussions, Register Now!
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Adelaide: Light's Inspirational Design
    Posts
    2,148

    Default

    My eldest sister whose husband died on Christmas Eve, doesn't want the problem of caring for her perfectly good kidney-shaped fibreglass swimming pool, and is thinking about having it removed and the ground filled in.

    Has anyone on AppleTalk done such a thing and can give advice and what the cost could be? She lives in Adelaide's northern suburbs. One thing she does know is that a crane would have to lift it over the house.
    Thinking about what next to think about . . . . . . . . .
    24" iMac: 15" iMac G4 "lampshade" 12" Performa 580

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Parramatta
    Posts
    3,357

    Default

    well i know nothing of how or what to do, but when it is lifted, can i have it i am wanting to put a pool in my backyard
    Just Chillin.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    694

    Default

    I'd think a bit more about not removing it...

    Removing it would certainly not be a cheap exercise by the time pool is gone and yard has been 'rebuilt'. I would suggest it would cost almost as much, if not more than the installation of the pool in the first place. If your sister doesn't want to look after it herself, she could pay someone to do it for her. I wouldn't expect that would cost too much over time, particularly compared to the removal of it.

    The other thing I would consider is selling the house and moving to somewhere without a pool... It should certainly attract a higher sale price, and probably sell more readily with the pool.

    Edit, I don't think she would get out of just the pool removal for under $8,000. Then start rebuilding the back yard... I've transported large palm trees a couple hundred kms on trucks, at a cost of $18,000 per tree for a landscape job I was involved in a few years ago. So yeah, it will not be cheap to lift a pool over a house and take it away.
    Pain is temporary. Quiting lasts forever.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    3,693

    Default

    Cover it with a deck or something, or just empty it
    Mac Pro Dual Xeon 2.8GHz Quad, 6GB Ram, 128GB SSD+320GB+3x1TB HDD, Nvidia GTX285, Mac OS X 10.7
    My Flickr | Portfolio/Photoblog

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    495

    Default

    Originally posted by mac_man_luke@Jan 22 2006, 01:11 PM
    just empty it
    Do not just empty it!

    I was under the impression that if you just emptied the pool, the pressure from the surrounding earth would eventually cause the pool to collapse inside itself. This earth would have to come from somewhere, perhaps from under a path, the garage or even the house. Not something I would be willing to risk.

  6. #6
    fompsweeva is offline You take your car to work, I'll take my board.

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Adelaide, SA
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    You could always just put big holes in the bottom and fill it with soil.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    wine country
    Posts
    3,020

    Default

    Fill it with hydroponics.
    You'll be able to pay for the removal in no time at all.
    Seriously I do not know why some would see this as an improvement that would increase your house price. Personally every way I look at it I see a reduction in value. Pools are a headache. Pools cost money now but are likely to both cost more and become more of a headache in future years, with new regulations regarding water use and storage etc.. Quite frankly I have known many people with pools and most of them have to employ someone to look after the pool for at least part of the year. Most of the year the pool is unused. Great for parties of course.. but then someone may always fall in and drown.
    I still remember the time I found a ribbon floating on the water and when I grabbed it, found it attached to my sister's head. Her face was blue and I was too small to get her out of the water. Luckily I caught the attention of older boys and thus parents.. Ouch that was 50 years ago.

    I'd go for filling it in and making a vege garden in it.. don't forget to drill the holes ^^

    Originally posted by Mark T
    *

    </div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE ("mac_man_luke" @ Jan 22 2006 &#064;* 01:11 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
    just empty it
    Do not just empty it&#33;

    I was under the impression that if you just emptied the pool, the pressure from the surrounding earth would eventually cause the pool to collapse inside itself. This earth would have to come from somewhere, perhaps from under a path, the garage or even the house. Not something I would be willing to risk. [/b][/quote]

    This is not necessarily so. However since sideways pressure is what holds the roof up and in the case of a pool there is no roof. I&#39;d say it is more likely than not, unless the rigidity of the pool is sound. A smaller pool will survive sideways pressure for longer than a larger one.
    why are you reading this?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Chasing rainbows
    Posts
    2,240

    Default

    Originally posted by mac_man_luke@Jan 22 2006, 01:41 PM
    Cover it with a deck or something
    That&#39;s the best option. Cheaper than having it removed and the pool is still there as a feature when the house is sold. The council should be able to give advice on all the possible options.
    Pass the crystal, spread the Tarot, in illusion comfort lies

    http://www.mistfall.com/

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Warwick, Australia
    Posts
    832

    Default

    The cost of buying a pool cover and then getting some one to come around every couple of months or more to maintain it for her over about 20 years, would probably cost no more then removing the pool. Also the pool will add value to the house.
    Macs:
    iPhone 5s 64Gb, iPod 60Gig

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    3,693

    Default

    pools are basically maintenance free if you have a self-chlorinator, over winter i hardly do any thing to my parents pool
    Mac Pro Dual Xeon 2.8GHz Quad, 6GB Ram, 128GB SSD+320GB+3x1TB HDD, Nvidia GTX285, Mac OS X 10.7
    My Flickr | Portfolio/Photoblog

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Oh my......if ONLY you were in BRISBANE&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

    SKATERS IN ADELAIDE&#33;&#33;&#33; ALERT ALERT ALERT&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

    A kidney shaped pool....that can be emptied....ohhh yeeeaaaaaahhhhhhhhh....drrrrooollllll....

    You should keep it, teach your kids to skate...they will love you all the more and stay home &#39;til they are 39&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;
    "You got arms Louie&#33; He&#39;s got spaghetti arms&#33;"
    - Matty Ferrigno to Lou, comparing his son&#39;s arms to Arnold Schwarzenegger&#39;s

    Trades: mivory

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Moon
    Posts
    504

    Default

    Oh my......if ONLY you were in BRISBANE&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

    SKATERS IN ADELAIDE&#33;&#33;&#33; ALERT ALERT ALERT&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

    A kidney shaped pool....that can be emptied....ohhh yeeeaaaaaahhhhhhhhh....drrrrooollllll....

    You should keep it, teach your kids to skate...they will love you all the more and stay home &#39;til they are 39&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

    Errrr, ok?




    But anyway I think a deck is the best option
    "You Bastard!" Craig Reucassel from the Chaser, talking to me on Triple J.

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Geelong, AU
    Posts
    7,387

    Default

    There are issues of course either way... how long does she intend staying in the house? That&#39;s probably the main question to ask. If she&#39;s considering downsizing in the next 5-10 years, it&#39;s probably not worth removing. If she doesn&#39;t want to maintain the pool, get a cheap bubble cover for it and talk to a pool shop. They&#39;ll help come up with a low-cost/time solution. If she wants to stay there indefinately, remove it. Might be able to sell the body if its ok and comes out in one piece. Will have a Lot of hole to fill though for a start. New plants etc don&#39;t have to cost the earth, if she&#39;s there for a long time she has time to get immature plants and watch them grow.
    From Macintosh Classic to Mac Book Pro... Dark Castle to Halo... Newton to iPad...

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,351

    Default

    the cheapest solution is to just keep it, cover it up with a deck.

    you can remove by using a building contracter to remove the pool completely, pipes, concrete etc.

    but you can also do a landfill which is the most common and is a cheaper solution. basically you disconnect the water pipes, remove electricals (if any), seal off pipes, then fill the pool with soil. contractors can perform this task, but it does cost a few thousand or so depending on the size of the pool, contract basis, hourly charges etc.

    i am not too certain what your covering up, a full size pool or a spar of some sort. of course the smaller the easier.

    but usually its pretty inexpensive and quick to have a landfill by a contractor. i wouldn&#39;t recomend doing it yourself because pools will have pipes, electrics etc so you can&#39;t just fill it in.

    and of course contact your local council for approval

  15. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    716

    Default

    Think outside the box:

    * Brick it in and add a stair = Wine cellar
    * Only fill in half of the hole = garden pond
    * Cover top with bars = &#39;The Hole&#39; - where you put the grandchildren if they misbehave
    * Use to breed bats = Personal unholy army of the night

    :P
    "O, what may man within him hide, Though angel on the outward side" - William Shakespeare

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Adelaide: Light's Inspirational Design
    Posts
    2,148

    Default

    Thank you for the various suggestions they have been informative, I shall put them to my sister. She is aged 76 and too old, tired and dissillusioned with life from the recent death of her husband from mesothelioma (asbestos related lung cancer), to want to bother with deckings and the like, and her "children" have their own families and all live too far away to benefit from the pool or other facilities. I shall also give her the names of pool companies to ask their advice, though my own advice is that she keeps the pool and has someone to maintain it. Currently a neighbour is helping.
    Thinking about what next to think about . . . . . . . . .
    24" iMac: 15" iMac G4 "lampshade" 12" Performa 580

  17. #17

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    I'm here, where are you?
    Posts
    649

    Default

    This is by far the weirdest topic I have seen on ATAU yet&#33;

    Personally I would fill the pool with ice and beer and invite us all round for an uber party&#33;
    "Scrolls as fast as butter&#33;" -- SJ

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Geelong, AU
    Posts
    7,387

    Default

    Georgina, my fiance spoke to our neighbours yesterday while she was mowing their lawn (bought house in June... only just bought our own mower yesterday and thought would re-pay the times they have mowed our nature strip)... our neighbour had a pool in their front yard, didnt want it, spoke to someone at the local council who managed to arrange for the roads-dept to fill it with soil from road works in the area... free of charge... may have just been good timing, but certainly worth a shot.
    From Macintosh Classic to Mac Book Pro... Dark Castle to Halo... Newton to iPad...

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    wine country
    Posts
    3,020

    Default

    That sort of thing may happen if you happen to know someone who knows someone, who knows that your pool is closer than the dumping site the council would have had to drive the fill to. Thus saving the council money in transport.

    Yes it is a case of good timing but I&#39;d suggest that the husband of the lady next door .. knows someone or drives a council truck..

    At 76 she may be better off to put the house on the market and get a small unit.

    My wife&#39;s parents did that and were very happy.
    1. no more large garden to look after
    2. no more large house to clean
    3. A lot of other elderly people do the same thing, so they were closer to all their old friends(retirement village)
    4. they left the pool and the pool maintenance behind and moved on.
    5. most of such units are kitted out with all the emergency alarms and things, with help available nearby. They are generally built to acommodate elderly people.
    why are you reading this?

  20. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Adelaide: Light's Inspirational Design
    Posts
    2,148

    Default

    My sister although 76 and with health problems, is hyperactive, and would go nuts in a retirement village with nothing to do. She relates to her neighbours very well (has gates to them through the back and side fences), but doesn&#39;t have any social skills to mix with others. She went to a day place last week and told me there was nothing they do which appeals to her. I think she needs more time to get over the death of her husband before any concrete life changing decisions are made. She isn&#39;t someone you can push to do things with out a severe reaction. Thus the swimming pool is on hold.

    Meanwhile I went into the Royal Adelaide Hospital yesterday for an angiogram, and spent the night in a nursing home to recover and be monitored. They have a special unit where they keep rooms available for people of all ages who need observation without the need for taking a hospital bed. A beautiful and spacious home like a quality hotel compared to the one my mother is in, but certainly not an environment you would want to live permanently unless you can&#39;t look after yourself any more. And yuk, they had a row of PC&#39;s for people to use, not a Mac in sight&#33;

    PS: With my angiogram I don&#39;t know the result yet, I suffered chest pains while it was being undertaken, and in the recovery room while a nurse put pressure on my groin for nearly half an hour to clot the blood and seal the artery, my blood pressure crashed and another nurse called out for a drug to inject into me. Passing out I wasn&#39;t able to respond to her telling me to speak to her, all told not a good day. It was interesting that the three nurses with me wore goggles in case the artery spurted&#33;&#33;&#33;
    Thinking about what next to think about . . . . . . . . .
    24" iMac: 15" iMac G4 "lampshade" 12" Performa 580

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •