Barely Legal Monday Morning News-chip-1.jpg
Over the weekend, the guys at Panic made a surprising discovery: the Lightning Digital AV adapter, the one that allows screen output over HDMI from a Lighting-equipped device, is actually a little mini computer. They first discovered the fact that the adapter doesn't allow true 1920x1080 output, then their curiosity was piqued when they saw compression artefacts in the output. One thing led to another, and hey, presto: one disassembled adapter. Their original theory postulated the adapter was some kind of AirPlay encoder/decoder, but a comment that appears to be from an Apple employee explains the whole thing, including how AirPlay is not involved in the operation of the adapter.

Apple's $1 billion in damages was almost halved over the weekend, after Judge Lucy Koh found two main errors in the way the jury calculated the final amount. Basically, the jury calculated the damages from Samsung's profits when they shouldn't have, and they also got the timeframe wrong, not taking into account the point at which Apple informed Samsung they were infringing on Apple's patents. With that said and done, it's important to note the final outcome of the trial: Samsung are still guilty of infringing Apple patents.

Apple has introduced a new corporate bylaw that requires Apple executives and directors to hold at least three to ten times their annual salary in stock. Apple CEO Tim Cook is required to hold ten times his $1.4 million annual salary. The reason for this new change is that "it's just good practice".

From now until March 12, you can stream the new David Bowie album from iTunes for free. It isn't the first time Apple has offered free streaming for albums before their official release, but what's seen as a publicity boost for the artist could very well be a test for Apple's soon-to-be launched streaming radio service that I keep hearing about.

If you're an Evernote user, take heed: "suspicious activity on the Evernote network that appears to have been a coordinated attempt to access secure areas of the Evernote Service." Because of this, Evernote has taken the precaution and reset passwords for all users even though no user data was accessed, Evernote believes usernames, email addresses, and encrypted passwords were, hence the password reset.

Apple has blocked the previous versions of Flash Player in Safari due to security reasons and to help protect users from a recent vulnerability, but you can download the latest version of Flash from the Adobe website. Apple provides a support article that gives you step-by-step instructions.

John Gruber doesn't write many longer pieces these days, but when he does, they're pretty damn good. His latest on the advantages of open versus closed platforms and how that affects companies starts off as a rebuttal piece to Tim Wu from The New Yorker, but quickly evolves into a deeper exploration of Apple's success over the years. A great read.

The Chromebook Pixel made a splash when it launched last week, mainly because it featured an ultra high-resolution display. It's a little pricey for a laptop that works mainly on the internet like other Chromebooks, but in a comparison between the Pixel and a lifelong Mac user, it doesn't fare too badly. In fact, it's actually pretty good; 3:2 aspect ratio display, large-ish price tag, and internet-connected functionality aside.

Permanent is the new app for spreadsheets on the iPad. It's loaded with smart features (I particularly like the undo timeline), and you can even script it with Lua. If I worked with spreadsheets on a daily basis, I'd be giving this a go.

It's nice to know that if I accidentally rack up a massive bill via in-app purchases (in, say, Real Racing 3), Apple will refund me. Probably. I mean, they did it for a kid in the UK who managed to spend over $2500, so they would do the same for me, right?

The coolest experience Chris Gonzales had as an Apple Store employee was when he sold about 15 MacBooks to a group of high school kids. Actually, that's only part of the story: the rest is amazing.

The somewhat alternate title of this morning's news is due to iCloud filtering emails containing the phrase "barely legal teen". Emails with that phrase in the body, in an attachment, or even in a zipped attachment will simply go into a black hole. Bad news for those that discuss the legalities of teens for business you would best be using another email service to do so, if that's your thing.